instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
Zoom Info
instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
Zoom Info
instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
Zoom Info
instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
Zoom Info
instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
Zoom Info
instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
Zoom Info
instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.
Zoom Info

instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.

archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.

[via Colossal and iGNANT]

Tam da sarhoş sarhoş işemelik sokak.

Aynı adamlar bunun için de şöyle demişler;
Biz burda bir avuç insan
Bir birimizden habersiz
Aynı şiiri yazar
Aynı şarkıyı söyler
Aynı duvara işer idik

#wall #light #deadend #street #sokak #çıkmazsokak #montreal

Tam da sarhoş sarhoş işemelik sokak.

Aynı adamlar bunun için de şöyle demişler;
Biz burda bir avuç insan
Bir birimizden habersiz
Aynı şiiri yazar
Aynı şarkıyı söyler
Aynı duvara işer idik

#wall #light #deadend #street #sokak #çıkmazsokak #montreal

fondaki şiir ismet özel’den münacaat.
fondaki müzik le trio joubran’dan masar.
fondaki video onur ünlü’den polis.

amına koyduğumun hayatında her şey fonda.

"Aşereye yazdım şahım 
Gel aşk için çek bir nefes 
Duman ile muhabbetle 
Cennet olur demir kafes” demiş.

#smoke #street #vsco #wall (Downtown Montreal, QC’da)

"Aşereye yazdım şahım
Gel aşk için çek bir nefes
Duman ile muhabbetle
Cennet olur demir kafes” demiş.

#smoke #street #vsco #wall (Downtown Montreal, QC’da)

muteferrik:

image

"He was born in the wrong era, on the wrong side of the river… With the ability to be able to do anything that he wants to do and… findin’ nothin’ that he wants to do."

#Utopia isimli dehşetengiz dizinin ilk bölümünün ilk 3 5 dakikasından bir kesit. Fondaki müzik de dizin soundtracklerinden. Yani demem o ki izleyin bu diziyi.